Gardens & Glass

I have long been an admirer of glass artist Dale Chihuly. A fellow University of Washington School of Art alumni, he is one of the great contemporary artists of our time. So, when Mary and I heard there was an installation in the Dallas Arboretum, it was not a matter of if, but when we would take a saunter through the grounds. It had to be after my own art obligations to the BIG(D)ESIGN 2012 Conference had been delivered and I had a chance to recover from the intense art creating time of the past few months.  So finally the day came when MyPhoneHenge was history and I was ready to go take in the spectacular mix of art and garden scenery.

The glass work, composed by a team of glass artists with Chihuly directing like a fine tuned machine, has become well-known for its organic forms and exuberant patterns as well as the vivid colors and light properties. The almost floral nature of the images has made the blending of these objects into a garden environment one of those mixes that makes you say, “Yes. Of course”.

Chihuly’s work can be seen in permanent exhibits in many public settings and the past few years has been seen in outdoor settings such as this one. The overcast day was perfect for getting some great photos of these pieces in the garden landscape. Here are some of my photos to enjoy here on my site.

Photographing art is also art. Photography to me is always about going in search of compelling compositions that show us some wonderful view of the subject that we might have otherwise missed. In this expedition, some of the images are of the glass alone while others are more about the unique view at the moment as the art interacts with light, shadow, and reflections, and other elements in the garden.

Some of these take on a painting-like motif, which I find particularly interesting since that’s how Dale Chihuly defines them in the first place, using quick spontaneous two-dimensional art to direct his staff in their creation.

As you can see, some of the most spectacular art in the gardens wil remain after the glass is gone.

– roger